We’ve all heard of it whether it be from events on our campuses or from articles in a magazine… but have we ever really looked into it? Do we actually know what it’s all about? Here’s your chance!
What is it?
Relay for Life (or Relay, as it is often referred to as) has been around for over 20 years and is the biggest fundraising event run by the American Cancer Society (ACS). It typically consists of an epic overnight walk and a camp-out made up completely of volunteers. Others events like luminaria, survivors laps, and ceremonies also take place. Teams of any size and even individuals (though we all know the more the merrier) are invited to partake in the festivities, which often include tons of food, music, and entertainment. All of this goes on while team members take their turns walking around a track. It is an enormous event full of camaraderie, friendships, fun, and community outreach.
Where can you do it?
If this sounds amazing to you, there are tons of Relay for Life events going on year-round all across America. Baltimore happens to have some of the biggest and best events across all of the local college campuses; Loyola, Towson, UMBC, JHU, and Stevenson are all planning on hosting events in the upcoming months.
We were fortunate enough to get to speak with the co-chairs of Towson’s Relay for Life, Erin Kelly and Gilbey Reilly. Both have been participating in Relay events for the past five years and Towson as a campus has been putting on Relay events for six years. Last year, Towson was able to fundraise an amazing $50,000 to help fight cancer. When asked about her favorite part of being in Relay events, Erin said “I love seeing people having a blast doing the activities that we planned and put so much effort into. Also, the best feeling is when people come up to you and thank you for all the dedication that you put into the event. It’s nice to know that people really do appreciate what we are doing.”
At the official Towson Relay for Life event in April, Gilbey and Erin are expecting about 1,000 people to come out, participate, fundraise, and have a blast of a time.
Okay…so now what?
Do yourself a favor and try to get involved with one of these amazing events. You’re sure to make new friends and memories, all for a remarkable cause. To find a Relay for Life event near you, just check with your local university or visit RelayForLife.Org and under the “My Relay” tab, click on “Find an Event.” You’ve got absolutely nothing to lose and can make a huge difference in the lives of others!
Know of any other Relay events going on? Plan on participating in one yourself? Let us know!

We’ve all heard of it whether it be from events on our campuses or from articles in a magazine… but have we ever really looked into it? Do we actually know what it’s all about? Here’s your chance!

What is it?

Relay for Life (or Relay, as it is often referred to as) has been around for over 20 years and is the biggest fundraising event run by the American Cancer Society (ACS). It typically consists of an epic overnight walk and a camp-out made up completely of volunteers. Others events like luminaria, survivors laps, and ceremonies also take place. Teams of any size and even individuals (though we all know the more the merrier) are invited to partake in the festivities, which often include tons of food, music, and entertainment. All of this goes on while team members take their turns walking around a track. It is an enormous event full of camaraderie, friendships, fun, and community outreach.

Where can you do it?

If this sounds amazing to you, there are tons of Relay for Life events going on year-round all across America. Baltimore happens to have some of the biggest and best events across all of the local college campuses; LoyolaTowsonUMBCJHU, and Stevenson are all planning on hosting events in the upcoming months.

We were fortunate enough to get to speak with the co-chairs of Towson’s Relay for Life, Erin Kelly and Gilbey Reilly. Both have been participating in Relay events for the past five years and Towson as a campus has been putting on Relay events for six years. Last year, Towson was able to fundraise an amazing $50,000 to help fight cancer. When asked about her favorite part of being in Relay events, Erin said “I love seeing people having a blast doing the activities that we planned and put so much effort into. Also, the best feeling is when people come up to you and thank you for all the dedication that you put into the event. It’s nice to know that people really do appreciate what we are doing.”

At the official Towson Relay for Life event in April, Gilbey and Erin are expecting about 1,000 people to come out, participate, fundraise, and have a blast of a time.

Okay…so now what?

Do yourself a favor and try to get involved with one of these amazing events. You’re sure to make new friends and memories, all for a remarkable cause. To find a Relay for Life event near you, just check with your local university or visit RelayForLife.Org and under the “My Relay” tab, click on “Find an Event.” You’ve got absolutely nothing to lose and can make a huge difference in the lives of others!

Know of any other Relay events going on? Plan on participating in one yourself? Let us know!

The political season is officially reaching its climax. Week after week, we have been quickly approaching the biggest political night of the year. All the ballyhoo from election night parties will soon be occupying your television as the news anchors jockey to call the race. But you don’t have to have to be in D.C. to get your political groove on.
Any election night comes with plenty of opportunities for student groups to join in on the excitement. One of many ways to do this is hosting a “watch party.” All you need is three basic things:
An Event
This is pretty simple – just turn on your TV to any of the big news stations. To give you a rundown of who will be anchoring on what stations, check out this list:
ABC: Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos
NBC: Brian Williams, David Gregory, Savannah Guthrie, and Tom Brokaw
CBS: Scott Pelley, Bob Schieffer, Norah O’Donnell, and John Dickerson
CNN: Wolf Blitzer and Anderson Cooper
Fox News: Bret Baier and Megyn Kelly
MSNBC: Rachel Maddow
You can also kick-it old school and tune into the coverage on your local NPR station.
A Screen
Whether it’s a hand-me-down television in your dorm room or a floor to ceiling projection screen in a lecture hall, you’re going to need something to watch the event on. If available, classrooms and lecture halls tend to hold crowds the best. Most things are streamed live through YouTube or respective websites, so setup shouldn’t be a hassle. And, if you’re feeling exceptionally creative and pumped up, why not try to set up more than one TV/Computer? With over five news channels and plenty of other stations showing their own coverage (MTV, VH1, C-Span), it couldn’t hurt to give your attendees a few different options!
Viewers
Perhaps the most important aspect of any event is the people! Create a Facebook event or take out an ad in your school’s paper. Consider giving out free stuff like t-shirts or other promos. Do anything you can to get the word out. An election night watch party wouldn’t be much fun without any viewers.
Some other options:
Food
Anything edible usually attracts college students to events, and keeps them coming back to others. Grab some snacks or order a few pizzas to ensure larger participation.
Discussion
Politics usually makes the intellectuals in the room want to chit chat. Build in some time to talk after the show is over. You can even plan questions ahead of time to get people’s brains moving and mouths running.
Using the formula above, any watch party should be a success, and even though the big day is tomorrow, there’s absolutely nothing stopping you from putting on the best Election Night in town!
Let us know if you’ve had any successful watch parties or other political events on your campus, we’d love to hear about them!

The political season is officially reaching its climax. Week after week, we have been quickly approaching the biggest political night of the year. All the ballyhoo from election night parties will soon be occupying your television as the news anchors jockey to call the race. But you don’t have to have to be in D.C. to get your political groove on.

Any election night comes with plenty of opportunities for student groups to join in on the excitement. One of many ways to do this is hosting a “watch party.” All you need is three basic things:

An Event

This is pretty simple – just turn on your TV to any of the big news stations. To give you a rundown of who will be anchoring on what stations, check out this list:

ABC: Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos

NBC: Brian Williams, David Gregory, Savannah Guthrie, and Tom Brokaw

CBS: Scott Pelley, Bob Schieffer, Norah O’Donnell, and John Dickerson

CNN: Wolf Blitzer and Anderson Cooper

Fox News: Bret Baier and Megyn Kelly

MSNBC: Rachel Maddow

You can also kick-it old school and tune into the coverage on your local NPR station.

A Screen

Whether it’s a hand-me-down television in your dorm room or a floor to ceiling projection screen in a lecture hall, you’re going to need something to watch the event on. If available, classrooms and lecture halls tend to hold crowds the best. Most things are streamed live through YouTube or respective websites, so setup shouldn’t be a hassle. And, if you’re feeling exceptionally creative and pumped up, why not try to set up more than one TV/Computer? With over five news channels and plenty of other stations showing their own coverage (MTV, VH1, C-Span), it couldn’t hurt to give your attendees a few different options!

Viewers

Perhaps the most important aspect of any event is the people! Create a Facebook event or take out an ad in your school’s paper. Consider giving out free stuff like t-shirts or other promos. Do anything you can to get the word out. An election night watch party wouldn’t be much fun without any viewers.

Some other options:

Food

Anything edible usually attracts college students to events, and keeps them coming back to others. Grab some snacks or order a few pizzas to ensure larger participation.

Discussion

Politics usually makes the intellectuals in the room want to chit chat. Build in some time to talk after the show is over. You can even plan questions ahead of time to get people’s brains moving and mouths running.

Using the formula above, any watch party should be a success, and even though the big day is tomorrow, there’s absolutely nothing stopping you from putting on the best Election Night in town!

Let us know if you’ve had any successful watch parties or other political events on your campus, we’d love to hear about them!

A college degree isn’t a sure thing anymore.
Many of us were told that our college years would be the best our lives - but are they really? Lately, it’s felt like there’s little we can do to guarantee our success in the future. Unemployment rates are terrifyingly high, good jobs require multiple degrees, and universities are becoming increasingly expensive by the minute. Many of us may study for years in the hopes that we can land a job just to pay-off our student loans. There’s little guarantee that our work will provide lasting financial stability - let alone job satisfaction - So how can any of us truly afford to sit-back and hope our degrees will land us a job - let alone a comfortable living? What if we start our own business? You know, create a startup?!? Yes, the startup scene is one of the hottest ‘things’ going on in our society today. Thousands of entrepreneurs have set-out on their own in hopes of ‘making it’. For many people that means different things.
Join the crowd. Start a company!
On October 20th, students, designers, programmers, and entrepreneurs converged on Stanford University for ‘Startup School’, a day-long lecture series aimed at examining the process of planting the seed of what may someday become a hugely successful company like Facebook or Pinterest. ‘Startup School' is billed as one of the best conferences for budding entrepreneurs to listen-to and learn-from successful founders such as Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Ben Silbermann, founder of Pinterest. As expected, their stories included many of the trials and tribulations we've come to expect from entrepreneurs; mostly the challenge of 'getting traction' and getting funded; however, each founder offered valuable advice to a crowd that consisted of many college students. Mark Zuckerberg remarked that 'college is great' saying that having the time to test and 'bake' your product before relying on it for income is really freeing. Perhaps this idea butted heads with what many might have been thinking: 'time to drop out of school and build the next Facebook… err Google.” Rather he remarked that he 'had a million users before we decided to drop out of Harvard'. This sobering anecdote pointed to the idea that creating a startup was no light affair.
'Making things takes a long time.'
This idea was taken further by Ben Silbermann, creator of Pinterest, who remarked that, ‘making things takes a long time’ - accounting for the number of years it took Pinterest to catch-on since he decided to quit his job. He began by speaking humbly of the mistakes and wrong directions his company took during its fledgling years. Silbermann recounted the hurdles and doubts from investors, but emphasized ignoring impulses to quit or fall in line. Rather, he championed the advice of his girlfriend.. the, ‘Do it or Stop Talking About it’ mentality that helped him to preserver. Thus he remarked that ‘the act of committing is the important thing’ - stressing that ideas can tend to reinvent themselves and as a result hardly ever get done. Silbermann also belabored the point that money wasn’t his primary motivation for building Pinterest. He boiled his talk down to the ultimate Cliff note.
"Build something you believe in - otherwise you’re going to burn out." -Ben Silbermann, Founder of Pinterest
So does the idea of creating a startup appeal to you? Does a college degree still present the greatest opportunity to you? Tell us what you think!

A college degree isn’t a sure thing anymore.

Many of us were told that our college years would be the best our lives - but are they really? Lately, it’s felt like there’s little we can do to guarantee our success in the future. Unemployment rates are terrifyingly high, good jobs require multiple degrees, and universities are becoming increasingly expensive by the minute. Many of us may study for years in the hopes that we can land a job just to pay-off our student loans. There’s little guarantee that our work will provide lasting financial stability - let alone job satisfaction - So how can any of us truly afford to sit-back and hope our degrees will land us a job - let alone a comfortable living? What if we start our own business? You know, create a startup?!? Yes, the startup scene is one of the hottest ‘things’ going on in our society today. Thousands of entrepreneurs have set-out on their own in hopes of ‘making it’. For many people that means different things.

Join the crowd. Start a company!

On October 20th, students, designers, programmers, and entrepreneurs converged on Stanford University for ‘Startup School’, a day-long lecture series aimed at examining the process of planting the seed of what may someday become a hugely successful company like Facebook or Pinterest. ‘Startup School' is billed as one of the best conferences for budding entrepreneurs to listen-to and learn-from successful founders such as Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Ben Silbermann, founder of Pinterest. As expected, their stories included many of the trials and tribulations we've come to expect from entrepreneurs; mostly the challenge of 'getting traction' and getting funded; however, each founder offered valuable advice to a crowd that consisted of many college students. Mark Zuckerberg remarked that 'college is great' saying that having the time to test and 'bake' your product before relying on it for income is really freeing. Perhaps this idea butted heads with what many might have been thinking: 'time to drop out of school and build the next Facebook… err Google.” Rather he remarked that he 'had a million users before we decided to drop out of Harvard'. This sobering anecdote pointed to the idea that creating a startup was no light affair.

'Making things takes a long time.'

This idea was taken further by Ben Silbermann, creator of Pinterest, who remarked that, ‘making things takes a long time’ - accounting for the number of years it took Pinterest to catch-on since he decided to quit his job. He began by speaking humbly of the mistakes and wrong directions his company took during its fledgling years. Silbermann recounted the hurdles and doubts from investors, but emphasized ignoring impulses to quit or fall in line. Rather, he championed the advice of his girlfriend.. the, ‘Do it or Stop Talking About it’ mentality that helped him to preserver. Thus he remarked that ‘the act of committing is the important thing’ - stressing that ideas can tend to reinvent themselves and as a result hardly ever get done. Silbermann also belabored the point that money wasn’t his primary motivation for building Pinterest. He boiled his talk down to the ultimate Cliff note.

"Build something you believe in - otherwise you’re going to burn out." -Ben Silbermann, Founder of Pinterest

So does the idea of creating a startup appeal to you? Does a college degree still present the greatest opportunity to you? Tell us what you think!